The Legend of Korra

Description:

Set in the world of Avatar: The Last Airbender, the next Avatar after Aang, Korra, is a spunky hotheaded girl who has always revealed in the fact that she is the savior of the world. Avatar Korra sees that being the Avatar might not be as glamours and as easy as she thought when she comes across adversaries who have their own ideas and philosophies on how the world should be run.

LGBTQ+ Positivity
Entertainment Value

One thought on “The Legend of Korra

  1. LGBT Positivity

    0.00

    Entertainment Value

    2.00

    Story

    9.00

    Acting

    9.00

    Cinematography

    8.00

    Legend of Korra is awesome! Take it from me, a self-proclaimed professional TV watcher. It is a strong, complex female…BISEXUAL PERSON OF COLOR, as its protagonist. WTF, how awesome is that? Not only that, this was a kid show, on Nickelodeon. I talk in depth in my Steven Universe commentary about how what we show to our kids can affect how they view the world. So the short version being, if we show people that are different or normally under/misrepresented, people of color, LGBTQ people, women, ect., in a positive and normal light in the media, then kids can grow up with that mindset. And Legend of Korra does just that…for at least two of those earlier examples.

    The show does wonders for showing that women and people of color are human beings, with complex emotions, and can be just as interesting as men and can even be badass heroes.

    I know shocker! What it doesn’t do well is its depiction of LGBTQ people. And it’s partly because I don’t think they planned to do KORRASAMI from the start, and partly because when they finally decided that’s the way they want to go, Nickelodeon said that they couldn’t. They drew the line at a brown female I guess, a queer one was to unfathomable…

    The relationship between Avatar Korra and Asami Soto, both bisexual women, is almost, and I repeat ALMOST nonexistent on the show… With my lesbo goggles on (patent pending) I could see the relationship budding between the two girls when season three arrived. Though we don’t get the courting as most straight men and women are forced to get on shows, we see that they have grown closer than any other two people on the show. There were a couple blushes throughout the season, a couple hugs, and some gestures that are grander than just simple friendship. We end the series with Korrasami holding hands and walking into the spirit world… And that’s all the representation we get. It was so little amount that the naysayers had a chance to go

    And they were able to pass off the girls’ relationship as extra special gal pals. And it wasn’t until the official statement from Bryke came out stating that yes Korra and Asami are in a relationship, it’s canon, that people got the clarification. But the problem was already there. Yes, technically Korra is the first bisexual character in a kids show, but we saw so little, that people were able to dismiss the idea entirely. Kids and frankly grown-ups need and deserve to see more. They deserve to see LGBTQ couples being treated the same way as straight couples do.

    Now, should you watch this show? YESSSSSSSSS! If you haven’t seen Avatar: the Last Airbender the show that LoK is a sequel/continuation of, I’d watch that first, and then watch Korra, and then… GET THIS! Read the Legend of Korra comic books!!! They are a direct continuation of the very last episode of the series. And we get to see all the representation that was lost in the show, now explored all throughout these books. They’re amazing. Avatar and Legend of Korra are awesome shows, the stories are great, and the characters are even better. And it doesn’t stop at the TV shows, the story continues on, and we get to see Korrasami shine!

     

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